“Scenes From a Marriage,“ “A Raisin in the Sun,” “My Man Godfrey,” and More on September Criterion Collection Slate

The Criterion Collection’s September releases start September 4 with the Blu-ray debut of Ingmar Bergman’s Scenes from a Marriage (Blu-ray: 2 discs, $49.95), which chronicles the many years of love and turmoil that bind a couple (Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson) through matrimony, infidelity, divorce, and subsequent partnerships. Originally conceived by director Bergman as a 1973 six-part television miniseries, the film is also presented here in its 1974 three-hour theatrical cut. Coming on September 11 is a new 4K restoration of Olivier Assayas’s long-unavailable 1994 coming-of-age masterpiece Cold Water (DVD: $29.95, Blu-ray: $39.95), recently released theatrically for the first time in the U.S.. Set at the outskirts of Paris in the early 1970s, the film tells the story of teenage lovers Gilles (Cyprien Fouquet) and Christine (Virginie Ledoyen), whose rebellions against family and society threaten to tear them apart. American inequality gets lampooned from the top down with the September 18 release of director Gregory La Cava’s 1936 Depression-era screwball comedy My Man Godfrey (DVD: $29.95, Blu-ray: $39.95), which stars Carole Lombard as an eccentric Manhattan socialite who wins a society-ball scavenger hunt after finding one of the items on the list: a “lost man” (William Powell), at a dump. Scheduled for September 25 is director Daniel Petrie’s 1961 A Raisin in the Sun (DVD: 2 discs, $29.95; Blu-ray: $39.95), the classic film version of Lorraine Hansberry’s groundbreaking play about a Chicago family’s struggle against racism and class barriers, starring Sidney Poitier and Ruby Dee, available in a new 4K restoration. Also arriving on September 25 is a 2K digital restoration and Blu-ray debut of Andrei Tarkovsky’s monumental 1966 epic Andrei Rublev (DVD: 3 discs, $39.95; Blu-ray: 2 discs, $49.95),  about the life of the titular renowned medieval Russian painter, in an edition that will include both the director’s preferred 185-minute cut and the extended cut that was suppressed by Soviet censors.